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Taken 26-Nov-10
Visitors 14


8 of 15 photos
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Keywords:Texas Historical Marker, Reeves County Historical Marker, The Reeves Cantaloupe
Photo Info

Dimensions4288 x 2848
Original file size6.05 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken26-Nov-10 11:38
Date modified26-Nov-10 11:38
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D90
Focal length58 mm
Focal length (35mm)87 mm
Max lens aperturef/5.1
Exposure1/80 at f/5
FlashNot fired, auto mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Unknown
ISO speedISO 400
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Pecos Cantaloupe

Pecos Cantaloupe

Pecos
Reeves County, Texas
31 25.650' N 103 29.734' W

Text: Nationally famed melon, originated in this city. Residents from 1880s grew melons in gardens, noting sun and soil imparted a distinctive flavor. Madison L. Todd (March 22, 1875-Sept. 10, 1967) and wife Julia (Jan. 30, 1880-Feb. 5, 1969) came here from east Texas and New Mexico. In 1917 Todd and partner, D. T. McKee, grew eight acres of melons, selling part of crop to dining cars of Texas & Pacific Railway, where Pecos cantaloupes first became popular and in wide demand. McKee soon quit business, but Todd remained a leader for 41 years. Famed lecturer Helen Keller, Presidents Eisenhower and Johnson and many other distinguished persons have ordered and appreciated Pecos cantaloupes. Exclusive clubs in New York, Chicago, St. Louis and other cities are regular clients of Pecos growers. Genuine Pecos cantaloupes begin ripening in July and continue on the market until late October. The varieties are the same as those grown in other areas. Climate, soil and special cultivation methods account for the distinctiveness of Pecos melons. 2,000 acres are now planted annually. M. L. Todd was known in his later years as father of the industry. He and his wife and family were leaders in civic and religious enterprises.