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Taken 13-Oct-18
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18 of 23 photos
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Categories & Keywords

Category:Travel and Places
Subcategory:
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Comanche Springs Ft. Stockton
Photo Info

Dimensions4288 x 2848
Original file size6.41 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken13-Oct-18 14:45
Date modified13-Oct-18 14:45
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D90
Focal length18 mm
Focal length (35mm)27 mm
Max lens aperturef/3.5
Exposure1/100 at f/10
FlashNot fired, auto mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Unknown
ISO speedISO 200
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Site of Comanche Springs

Site of Comanche Springs

Ft. Stockton
Pecos County, Texas
30 53.122' N 102 52.538' W
Directions: Start at the intersection of Spring Street and 1st Street. The marker is on the east side of the intersection.

Text: Used as a watering place and camping ground by Indians since Pre-Columbian times, the Springs were possibly visited about 1536 by Spaniard Cabeza de Vaca on his wanderings through Texas. The expedition of Juan de Mendoza, with his party of Spaniards and Jumano Indians, camped near the waters in 1684. The six major, gushing springs and the beautiful river they formed resulted from water seeping up through geological faults to the earth's surface. The reservoir which supplied them was located in the formation known as "Trinity Sand." The Springs, among the largest in all Texas, were one of the few good watering places in this arid region. They supplied Indians raiding into Mexico on the nearby Comanche war trail and also gold seekers traveling to California on the southern route, 1849 and later. Butterfield Overland Mail stage stopped here as well, and after 1859 the Springs provided water for Fort Stockton, which was founded both to protect the mail and stop the Comanche raids. The Springs began to be tapped for irrigation as early as 1875, but today irrigation projects to the north and west have reduced the underground water supply so much that the Springs no longer flow.