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Taken 21-Apr-18
Visitors 12


20 of 27 photos
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Categories & Keywords

Category:People
Subcategory:
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Grimes County Historical Marker, Primus Kelly
Photo Info

Dimensions4288 x 2848
Original file size6.24 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken21-Apr-18 08:14
Date modified21-Apr-18 08:14
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D90
Focal length18 mm
Focal length (35mm)27 mm
Max lens aperturef/3.5
Exposure1/60 at f/8
FlashNot fired, auto mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Unknown
ISO speedISO 200
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Primus Kelly

Primus Kelly

Navasota
Grimes County, Texas
30 13.950' N 96 03.275' W
Directions: Start at the intersection of CR-330 and SH-6. Go .6 miles south on SH-6. The marker is on the right (west) side of the road.

Text: A faithful Negro slave. Came to nearby Courtney, Grimes County in 1851 with his master, John W. S. West from North Carolina. West was a prominent and wealthy pioneer planter and landowner. At the outbreak of the Civil War, West sent Kelly "to take care" of his three sons-- Robert M., Richard and John Haywood-- who joined the famous Terry's Texas Rangers, where they served with distinction. Kelly was not content "to wait on" his charges but joined them in battle, firing his own musket and cap and ball pistol. Twice Kelly brought to Texas the wounded Richard, twice took him to the front again. After war, bought a small farm near "Marse Robert", raised a large family and prospered. Died in 1890s. The courage and loyalty of Kelly was typical of most Texas Negro slaves. Hundreds "went to war" with their masters. Many operated the farms and ranches of soldiers away at war, producing food, livestock, cotton and clothing for the Confederacy. Others, did outside work to support their master's families. They protected homes from Indians, bandits and deserters and did community guard and patrol duty. At war's end, most slaves, like Primus Kelly, became useful and productive citizens of Texas.