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Taken 11-Sep-15
Visitors 15


15 of 72 photos
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Photo Info

Dimensions4928 x 3264
Original file size9.16 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken11-Sep-15 16:38
Date modified11-Sep-15 16:38
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D7000
Focal length32 mm
Focal length (35mm)48 mm
Max lens aperturef/3.4
Exposure1/125 at f/5.6
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Unknown
ISO speedISO 250
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Conrad Fuchs House

Conrad Fuchs House

Marble Falls
Burnet County, Texas
30 31.989' N 98 19.648 W
Directions: Start at the east intersection of Mountain Dew Road and Stagecoach. Go 100 yards south on Stagecoach. The house is on the south side of the road. Stagecoach intersects Mountain Dew Road twice. These directions are from the eastern intersection.

Text: Conrad L. Fuchs, born in Germany in 1834, came to Texas in 1845 with his parents, Pastor and Mrs. Adolf Fuchs, who settled in Austin County. The Fuchs family moved into this area of Burnet County in 1853. In 1861, Conrad Fuchs married Anna E. Perlitz at Black Jack Springs, in Fayette County, and soon returned to move into a log cabin on this property, which was granted to him by the State of Texas on May 15, 1862. When Fuchs decided to join the Confederate Army, he took his wife back to Fayette County, and enlisted in an artillery unit. After the Civil War, he returned here and built a steam grist and saw mill on nearby Tiger Creek. On Sept. 2, 1872, the "Tiger Mill" Post Office was opened, and Conrad Fuchs named postmaster. Located on the Burnet-Willow City Road, Tiger Mill became the community center for the early settlers in this area. In the late 1870s or early 1880s, Conrad Fuchs built this house to accommodate the post office and his growing family of 6 children. It was constructed of field stone in the pioneer German style, with a large central hall, shingled roof, and plastered interior. Mrs. Fuchs held school for area children in the home. After Conrad Fuchs' death, Feb. 16, 1898, Mrs. Fuchs sold the property. The house was restored in 1972-73.